Archive for February, 2012


Written by author
February 19th, 2012


Begin the visit of this site with “Why Bat kama at”?

Begin the first visit of this website with Why Bat kama at ?

Commencer la première visite de ce site par Pourquoi Bat Kama At

From Survivor Mina Bod

Written by author
February 19th, 2012

Mina Bod was interviewed on July 21, 2008 in her apartment in Holon and confirmed much information given to the author by Rosa Portnoi and Moishe Rozenbaumas.
Publishing the documents recently located in the Lithuanian Central Archives leads us to a document possibly for an entrance exam that she took for the year 1935/1936.
We will soon publish excerpts from her interview on our page Films and testimonies where she recalls the fate of her sister Dvoyre Bod who was killed trying to escape in the direction of Poland. The father of the author, who used to work as a tailor in the workshop of Zalman Bod, remembered Dvoyre as the most beautiful girl in the city. Dvoyre’s diploma, recovered in the file 1382 of the Lithuanian Central Archives will soon be published on this website under her Lithuanian name Dvaura Bodaite.

Visitors of Bat Kama At discover names of members of their family

First time today a visitor has discovered on the page “500 names, 500 noms” the name of his relative:
“Thank you for working on this remarkable project. The Guta-Mera Broide listed above, is my great-Aunt Miriam who came to the United States with most of her siblings before the war.”
And was able to discover a school document relating to the Jewish education of his grand-Aunt in the Gymnasium Yavne in Telz/Telsiai, in Lithuania, on the page School was Life
1st page of document BKAVA1382-68a


2nd page of document BKAVA1382-68b

Guta-Mera’s diploma was delivered in 1928. As we can see, she has studied Hebrew, Lithuanian, German and English, as well as a propedeutics class to Philosophy.
We know from the catalogue to these documents that the level in Languages and Science was reinforced in this hight school, and that in 1931 Latin has replaced English.